Planning Permission For Gardens

It’s often said that an Englishman’s home is his castle, but this isn’t exactly true. Although in most cases you have complete freedom over how you decorate your home and what you get up to within your own four walls, there are lots of different rules and regulations around building extensions and renovating. Many homeowners are under the impression that Building Control rules and Planning Permission laws only apply to the house itself, and are surprised to learn that in some cases they also apply to what you do in your garden

multicolored flowerbed on a lawnCompare quotes for gardening, garden design and landscaping from gardeners across the UK with Top TradespeopleIt’s often said that an Englishman’s home is his castle, but this isn’t exactly true. Although in most cases you have complete freedom over how you decorate your home and what you get up to within your own four walls, there are lots of different rules and regulations around building extensions and renovating. Many homeowners are under the impression that Building Control rules and Planning Permission laws only apply to the house itself, and are surprised to learn that in some cases they also apply to what you do in your garden.

Planning Permission and Fences

The first area of the garden where planning permission may come into force is around the subject of fences. If you wish to put up a fence more than 1 metre high next to a road, or 2 metres high elsewhere in the garden, you will need to apply for planning permission. This only applies in cases of new fences; if you already have a fence in the garden which is over 2 metres tall and you wish to replace it with an identical one, you will not need planning permission. There is separate legislation applying to listed buildings and conservation areas, so if this is relevant for your house or a neighbouring one, check with the council before putting your fence up. Similar rules apply to walls and gates, but if the wall concerned forms a boundary between you and your neighbour, Party Wall legislation comes into play too. Boundary disputes are one of the most common reasons of neighbours falling out and having to take legal action against each other, so before you start knocking walls or fences down to replace them with something else, have a chat with your neighbour to get their thoughts on the matter.

Garden Sheds and Planning Permission

Sheds, summer houses, sauna cabins, garden offices and other outbuildings in the garden are all classed as the same sort of thing under planning legislation. Small garden sheds and outbuildings which are less than 2.5 metres tall and which don’t cover more than half of your garden space can be put up without needing planning permission. If you are planning a shed or garden room which is bigger than that, which is in your front garden rather than out back, has a balcony or raised platform, or has two storeys needs to be approve first by the planners. Different rules apply to people living in or next to a listed building, in conservation areas or within the boundaries of National Parks.

Garden Buildings and Building Regulations

Once you’ve overcome the planning obstacles to your new garden shed or home office, then the next hurdle is Building Control. The Building Control department of your local council are only interested in garden buildings which are less than 15 square metres in size and which aren’t designed for sleeping in. If you are planning a building of a size between 15 and 30 square metres, there are rules regarding fire safety but you will not need building control approval. In other cases where the planned building is larger, or if you are planning to use it as a guest bedroom, you will have to make sure it is constructed to the standards laid out by Building Control. This does not apply to home offices, play rooms or any additional living space which does not have a bed, but if you are putting plumbing or electricity into your home office or garden room you will have to make sure that your electrician contractors are properly qualified and that their work is up to standard.

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Decking and Planning Permission

We can blame the garden makeover shows of the late 1990s for our collective obsession with decking. Having a wooden platform somewhere in the garden gives you a flexible space for sitting out and where children can play, and decking is easy to maintain and keep clean. Decking is usually classed as “permitted development” meaning you can get someone in to build your decking without going through the planning process, but in some conditions planning permission may be required. If you want to install decking which is more than 30cm above the level of the ground or which covers more than 50% of the size of the garden when you take sheds into account, you will need planning permission.

Paving your Front Garden

Over the past few years we have had more severe flooding in the UK than ever before, and rules about paving over your front garden have been amended to try to minimise the risks. Most of the sudden flooding problems were caused by drains not being able to cope with water, and as water cannot flow through a hard paved surface into the ground as it can soak into a garden, the rules about paving have been tightened up. This applies in all areas, not just in areas which have experienced flooding. If you are replacing an existing driveway or paved area, you do not need panning permission. If you are wanting to pave an area with an impermeable surface like slabs or tar, you will need to go through the planning process. You can get around this requirement by looking at other sorts of surfaces which do allow water to get through. These permeable surfaces include gravel, stone chips, special clay block paving or porous asphalt. Speak to your local paving contractor who will be able to explain the features and benefits of the different options.

Retrospective Planning Permission and the Rules in Scotland and Northern Ireland

If you are not aware of the rules and put up a garden building which is too big or a fence which is too high, it is possible to apply for planning permission retrospectively, that is after the work has been done. This is a risky strategy though as you might be asked to remove the fence, decking or shed and return the garden to the way it was before if planning permission is refused. It’s also worth noting that the laws differ in Northern Ireland and Scotland to the law in England and Wales, so check with your local planning office before starting work.

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Part L Building Regulations Guide (Conservation of fuel and Power)

In the last couple of decades we have all become much more aware about how much energy we are using in our homes and how best to stop the heat escaping. Some of the changes, such as the phasing out of old style light bulbs and government grants to pay for loft insulation and new boilers, are aimed at addressing energy efficiency in existing homes to upgrade their performance. Building Regulations tackle the problem from the other end, and set out rules and guidelines around energy efficiency for people who are extending their current home by converting a loft or building onto the back, or are undertaking a self-build project from scratch.

Technician repairing an hot-water heater - But what is Part L Building regulations all about when it comes to our homes and conserving energy?Compare quotes from heating engineers from across the UK with Top Tradespeople, tradesmen sitePart L Building Regulations - In the last couple of decades we have all become much more aware about how much energy we are using in our homes and how best to stop the heat escaping. Some of the changes, such as the phasing out of old style light bulbs and government grants to pay for loft insulation and new boilers, are aimed at addressing energy efficiency in existing homes to upgrade their performance. Building Regulations tackle the problem from the other end, and set out rules and guidelines around energy efficiency for people who are extending their current home by converting a loft or building onto the back, or are undertaking a self-build project from scratch.

Zero Carbon Targets

The overall aim of the Building Regulations Part L is to achieve zero carbon homes by 2016. This will be done by hugely reducing the amount heat lost through buildings and by encouraging the use of renewable energy such as solar and wind power instead of relying on fossil fuels such as gas or coal. These new standards came into force in April 2014, and are just the last in a long line of changes to the existing building control standards. They’re unlikely to be the last changes either, as targets on renewable energy and emissions get tighter and stricter. The rules are lengthy and technical, and if you are planning an extension or considering a self-build property it is essential that your architect and builder is completely up to speed with the new rules and how they would apply in your case.

U-values

The main way in which your home is measured to see if it satisfies the new tighter criteria laid out in Part L of the regulations is in U-values. Every building material which is used to construct your home is given a U-value. The lower the U-value, the more effective the material is at insulating the building. When you are planning your new extension or self-build property, your architect and builder will have to look at the overall U-value of the property. It’s no longer enough to add in lots of loft insulation and fill the cavity walls, the use of every building material will have to go into the overall calculation. At the planning stage, council officials will inspect the plans you have submitted for approval to make sure that the building is sufficiently energy efficient. It is important to get things right at this stage as it is much more costly and inconvenient to add more insulation or change your windows at a later date.

Renewable Energy and Part L Building Regulations

Part L of the building regulations also encourages builders and developers to think about ways in which they can use renewable energy to provide power and heat to the building. Some of the types of renewable energy which the government is encouraging include ground source heat pumps, solar panels and wind turbines. The type of renewable energy which is most appropriate will depend where in the country you live and what type of house you have. Some of these options can be costly, especially when you are trying to retro fit them into an older property rather than one you are building from scratch. One thing to remember is that if your house is “off grid” and not attached to a mains gas supply, you have more flexibility in terms of U-values than one which is heated by mains gas. Your architect or builder is the best person to advise you on how easy it would be to use different renewable technologies in your home, and what impact they may have in terms of both finance and carbon footprint.

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Keeping on the right side of Part L regulations

Although most architects and builders are up to speed with the new Part L building regulations and are incorporating them into their plans, it may be that some plans may be knocked back at the planning stage if they cannot prove that the building is efficient enough. For example, if you have your heart set on a wall of glass concertina doors along one wall of your home, you might have to have triple glazing rather than double and ramp up the level of insulation elsewhere in the room to get under the required U-value for the house. Often arriving at the right combination of building materials, glass, insulation and energy sources is a balancing act which has many different variables. There night have to be negotiation back and forwards with your local Building Control office, and this is best handled by your architect or builder who fully understands the technical specifications of the products he is planning to use. Ask the building department to inspect your project at various different stages; problems with there not being enough insulation or the wrong sort of glass being used are quicker to fix before all of the painting and plastering has been done.

Exemptions from Part L Building Regulations

The whole idea behind the building regulations in general is that they cover the majority of new homes, commercial buildings and renovation projects in the UK. There are certain exemptions to the rules though, so if you live in a listed building you might be off the hook. Some smaller buildings such as garden rooms or home offices which cover an area of less than 50 square metres are also exempt, unless you are planning to use them for sleeping in. Buildings which are designed to be temporary are also exempt. The government is working to tighten up this legislation wherever possible and it is likely that categories of exemption and the requirements in terms of energy efficiency are going to become stricter in the future. Take advice from the building professionals, and be prepared to compromise on your desired plans – without a building control certificate, you will not be able to sell your property in the future.

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Bathroom Building Regulations Guide

Many homeowners think that as long as they are not making changes to the outside of their home that they don’t have to inform the Council about work which is being carried out, but this is not the case. Although planning permission will not be needed unless you are building your bathroom in a new extension, Building Control may have to be involved, depending on what you are doing. Here’s our simple bathroom building regulations guide. Always remember, of course, to keep in touch with your local authority building control office at all times throughout the course of your bathroom refurbishments.

Compare bathoom fitters quotesbathroom-with-built-in-furnitureMany homeowners think that as long as they are not making changes to the outside of their home that they don’t have to inform the Council about work which is being carried out, but this is not the case. Although planning permission will not be needed unless you are building your bathroom in a new extension, Building Control may have to be involved, depending on what you are doing. Here’s our simple bathroom building regulations guide. Always remember, of course, to keep in touch with your local authority building control office at all times throughout the course of your refurbishments.

Installing a New Bathroom

One of the jobs which Building Control need to know about is when you are switching around the layout of your house and putting a bathroom where there wasn’t one before. This covers things like moving a bathroom upstairs in an older property, or adding an en-suite to a bedroom. There are many different regulations which have to be followed, and most are about making sure the bathroom is drained and ventilated properly. Electrical regulations also apply when you are putting lighting or other electrical items such as showers in your new bathroom.

Bathrooms and Floor Structures

One of the main issues which concerns Building Control and bathrooms is making sure that the structure of your floor is up to bearing the weight of any new bathroom. A full bath weighs a considerable amount, and the regulations are there to make sure that you are kept safe. Before work starts, you will have to submit an application to Building Control stating what you intend to do, and they may ask for a report from a structural engineer. If you are unsure whether the work you are planning comes under the remit of Building Control, call the local Council and ask to speak to someone.

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Electrics in the Bathroom

One of the biggest changes to bathroom building regulations came into force in 2005 with what is known as “Part P”. This part of the rules covers electrical work in the bathroom and means that any major electrical work such as installing new lights, a new electric shower or underfloor heating has to either be carried out by a qualified electrician, or certified by them after the work has been done. These requirements are designed to cut the number of people who are electrocuted by bodged bathroom wiring, but will add substantially to your costs. Expect to pay around £400 for an electrician to install a new electric shower for you, and supply you with the correct paperwork to send to Building Control.

Building Control Costs

Building Control is a matter for your local Council, and the charges and costs are not the same in each area. Check on your local Council website; many now allow you to submit applications and track their progress online, and pay using a card over the internet. Building control charges are usually based on the value of the work being done. Expect to pay around £100 for electrical work to be checked and the certificate rubber stamped, up to £500 plus for the fees associated with moving a bathroom from one area of the house to the other. These is no escaping these fees, as anyone buying your house in the future will need to see the certificates from the Council.

Need A Bathroom Fitter?

If you need a bathroom fitter and are looking for quotes from plumbers or bathroom fitters you can use our free service to compare quotes from several local plumbers. You will are not obliged to accept any quotes from tradesmen but comparing quotes using Top Tradespeople free plumbers quotes services could save you time and save you money by helping you get the best deal on bathroom fitting. Request quotes from bathrooms tradesmen with Top Tradespeople.

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Roofs Planning Permission And Building Control

There’s a great deal of confusion about what you can and cannot do with your home without informing the local Council or getting their permission. The situation is complicated further by local variations to the rules depending on where you live in the country, and often the best people for being in the know about the local situation is your local roofing contractor. There are though some basic rules which apply across the country.

Roofs planning permission. What are the current requirements for roofs planning permission when it comes to making alterations or repairs to an existing roof and what is needed to be compliant when it comes to new roofs? - Compare quotes from roofers and roofing contractors for roof work and and fascias soffits and gutters, lead flashing and other roofing workWhen it comes to existing roofs, what are roofs planning permissions and what is involved with regards to new roofing or complete replacement roofs? There’s a great deal of confusion about what you can and cannot do with your home without informing the local Council or getting their permission. The situation is complicated further by local variations to the rules depending on where you live in the country, and often the best people for being in the know about the local situation is your local roofing contractor. There are though some basic rules which apply across the country.

Roofs Planning Permission - Roof Repairs

If you are making a repair to your roof, such as fixing a slipped tile, mending broken flashing or fixing crumbling mortar on your chimney, you do not need to get permission from the local Planning department or involve Building Control. The one main exception to this is if you live in a listed building. Permission is needed for any sort of alteration to a listed building, and the Council will want to be sure that you are using the same sort of tiles, slates and mortar as on other parts of the roof so everything blends in.

Compare quotes from roofers and roofing contractors for roof work and and fascias soffits and gutters, lead flashing and other roofing work

Roofs Planning Permission - Replacement Roofs

If rather than making a repair to your roof you have decided to replace it completely, this is where things start to get a little more complicated. In addition to getting the appropriate permissions if you live in a conservation area or a listed building, you will also have to inform your local Building Control department about the work. A good roofing company will be completely up to speed with the current building standards and regulations, and should be able to work within the conditions set out by Building Control. An inspector may visit your home during the work to inspect the materials being used and to check key aspects of the roofing such as the strength of the beams, and will issue a certificate once the work has been completed. This certificate is required when it comes to selling your house.

Building Control are also concerned with the insulation in your property, and the regulations mean that you have to ensure that the new roof meets the standards set out. Again, a competent local roofer will know what the standards are and will be able to help you choose the right sorts of products.

Choosing the Best Roofing Contractor

If you do live in a listed building, are planning on raising the height of your roof, replacing it completely or making some other sort of dramatic change, it is more important than ever to have a great roofing company working for you. Always contact at least three local companies to ask for quotes for the work you want done, and ask about their experience in working on similar sorts of projects and in working within current Building Control regulations. A good roofer will be happy to talk you through the options and explain how the work they are proposing fits into the regulations. Compare quotes carefully before choosing a roofing company, and remember that the cheapest quote isn’t always the one to go for – consider also timescales, reputation, customer service and guarantees offered. A high calibre roofing company should be well versed in all roofs planning permissions and building regulations. If in any doubt, always look to get in touch with your local building control office at the council.

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Electrics Part P Building Regulations Legislation

Considering carrying out electrical works to your property? Here is a handy guide regarding building regulations and planning permission with regards to electrical home improvement work

Compare electricians quotes for bathroom electrics and other household electrical workElectrics part p building legislationGuide To Planning Permission and Building Regulations Relating To Electrical Works

Considering carrying out electrical works to your property?
Here is a handy guide regarding building regulations and planning permission with regards to electrical home improvement work

Planning Permission Relating To Electrical Works

Installing or replacing electrical circuits to your home is not normally subject to planning permission requirements however if your home is a listed building or is in a listed or protected area you would be wise to contact your local building control or planning authority office to check whether there are any permissions required before proceeding with your electrical work.

electrical rewiresElectrical Work To Homes In England And Wales

When carrying out electrical work to your property you now need to ensure you follow these guidelines:
Ensure that the electrical work you have carried out is performed by an electrical installer who is registered with a competent person scheme.
This does not normally apply to replacement works such as electrical repairs, changing existing sockets or light switches or alterations to existing lighting or power sockets.
This DOES APPLY to all electrical works carried out in bathroom areas, kitchen areas or gardens (exterior areas) - all works carried out to these areas should be carried out by a competent person in accordance with Part P of the Building Regulations Document
The installer who carries out your work in accordance with a competent persons scheme should provide you with a certificate called an Electrical Installation Certificate.
This shows that the work was carried out to a safe standard.
Always ask electricians who carry out electrical work on your home which Competent Person Scheme they belong to and for evidence of their membership number.
In this way, you will be able to check that they truly are competent to carry out your electrical work.
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building plansMinor Electrical Works

Certain minor works are allowed under the terms of the Building Regulations relating to electrical works.
These works do not normally have to be notified to building control.
These normally do not have to be carried out by a registered electrician.
It is often wiser to use the services of an expert contractor (in this case a qualified electrician) whenever carrying out home improvements or property renovations.
The list of minor works which normally do not require building regulation notification and can be carried out without the services of a registered electrician is made up of the following:

Electrical maintenance or repair work.

Installation of low voltage cable for items such as fire alarms, burglar alarms, telephone sockets, etc.
Replacing an existing electrical point or electrical fitting, light switches and electrical sockets (existing).
Adding fused spurs to existing appliances.
Areas listed above, e.g. bathrooms, kitchens and gardens (exterior areas) do not apply to this and must be carried out by a registered competent person.
Bonding installation or upgrades.

Architect rolls and plans blueprints home building conceptCompetent Person Schemes

Organisations involved in the competent persons scheme include the following:
  • NAPIT
  • CORGI
  • NICEIC

If In Doubt?

If in doubt about any electrical works it is always wise to seek advice from a formal body or building control.
Top Tradespeople do not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of this information and professional advice should always be sought if in doubt prior to commencing any home improvement projects.
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Building Regulations For Loft Conversions

Planning permission for loft conversion projects is not normally required under new building regulations which came into effect on 1st October 2008, which stated that loft conversions for your home are considered a permitted development work, not needing planning permission as long as certain conditions are met as detailed below

 

Compare quotes from builders across the UKGuide To Loft Conversions Building Regulations Planning Permission

Loft conversions building regulations.  If you are looking to convert your loft here is a quick guide to current building Regulations and planning Permission for loft conversions.

Planning Permission Required For Loft Conversions

apartment-406901_1920Planning permission for loft conversion projects is not normally required under new building regulations which came into effect on 1st October 2008.

This regulation stated that loft conversions for your home are considered a permitted development work, not needing planning permission as long as certain conditions are met as detailed below:

loft conversionPermitted Loft Conversion Development Guidelines

Guidelines as at 1st October 2008.

Please check to ensure that before proceeding with any loft conversion work.

These guidelines or legislation has not been revised.

  • The loft conversion cannot extend beyond the plane of the existing roof slope to the principal front elevation.
  • Materials used for the loft conversion should be similar in appearance to the existing property.
  • Any side facing windows to the loft conversion must use obscure-glazing with any window opening to be 1.7m about the floor.
  • Roof extensions for loft conversions or similar are not a permitted development in certain designated areas which include national parks and the Broads, conservation areas, world heritage sites and areas of outstanding national beauty.
  • No extension is to be higher than the higher than the highest point of the existing roof.
  • No raised platforms, verandahs or balconies
  • Volume allowances of additional roof space of 40 cubic metres for terraced properties and 50 cubic metres for detached and semi-detached houses are permitted without planning permission, however any existing roof space additions previously added need to be included in these volume allowance. You may need to consider whether previous owners of the property have added additional roof space.

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Converting Roof Space Into Liveable Areas

Home Builder 4

If you wish to convert your roof space into a liveable area then loft conversions building regulations approval is needed.

The general guidelines are listed below for converting roof space into a liveable loft conversion area and are largely broken down into five main categories.

These guidelines relate to properties with a maximum of two storeys only.

Properties which are higher than two storeys may require additional building control approval.

The five main areas to consider regarding building regulations on loft conversions to liveable space.

  • The strength structurally of the new floor which will be required to take the weight (load) needs to be sufficient.
  • There must be safe escape from fire with a 30 minute fire door installed.
  • There must be stairs which have been safely designed for the new loft conversion.
  • Sound insulation between the rooms below and the loft conversion must be adequate.
  • The stability of the property's structure must not be endangered by the loft converson. This includes the existing roof structure.

apartment-966185_1920When considering any kind of work which may require building regulations approval or planning permission.

It is always wise to contact your local Building Control for further advice.

Top Tradespeople do not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of this information and professional advice should always be sought.

If in doubt prior to commencing any home improvement projects.

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Fitting Doors Building Regulations

You do not normally need to have planning permission when you are replacing existing doors, however you should always remember that if you live in a conservation area, an area considered to be of outstanding natural beauty or in a listed building you should ensure that you always contact building control or your local planning office before undertaking any kind of home improvement project as the rules relating to these kind of properties and areas are different to those of non listed or standard residential areas.

Compare quotes from carpenters for carpentry and joinery across the UK with Top TradespeopleWhen thinking of fitting doors building regulations as always should be consideredFitting Doors? - A Guide To Building Regulations And Planning Permission Relating To Doors

Planning Permission

You do not normally need to have planning permission when you are replacing existing doors.

However, you should always remember that if you live in a conservation area, an area considered to be of outstanding natural beauty or in a listed building you should ensure that you always contact building control or your local planning office before undertaking any kind of home improvement project.

The rules relating to these kind of properties and areas are different to those of non listed or standard residential areas.

If you are fitting new glazing to doors you should bear in mind other legislation too.

These additional regulations relate to glazing works which take into consideration safety, heat loss and environmental matters.

Hallway with an open door to a living room with an antique stove and chest.Building Regulations Relating To Fitting Doors

If you are making a new door opening in an external wall or a load bearing wall you may have to comply with building regulations.

It is important that you investigate this with your local building control office.

In the event that you come to sell your property, any major structural work (which may well include making external openings in walls or openings in load bearing walls) would need to be certified by building control.

Failure to provide proper certification may even lead to your having to reinstate the property to its prior condition.

One area which also may make a difference is if you choose to add a conservatory with external doors into it.

If you use external doors between the main property and the conservatory area you are likely to need permission.

In this case, it is likely that your conservatory would need planning permission, so you should investigate.

When selling your home, clearly, the last thing you would want is to have hold ups.

Particularly if these are because you failed to carry out works to your property without being compliant with paperwork.

Miniature House With Various Drafting Items and Plans.If In Doubt - Check It Out

For the sake of a phone call or even an online enquiry it really is not worth holdups and trouble further down the line.

It is always important to ensure that any home improvement work is carried out in accordance with current building legislation.

You should always ensure it has the appropriate planning permission if required.

Building regulations are constantly changing so it is important to check out whether your latest project requires any kind of permission or certification before proceeding.

A good contractor will have a good idea of the current legislation regarding building works.

However it is best to speak to an impartial source for advice when seriously considering home improvement.

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Basement Conversions Building Regulations

If you are considering converting your basement or cellar it might be worth finding out if there are any planning permission issues or building regulations matters to be investigated first. Remember, if planning permission or building regulations approval is not sought and works are carried out, completed or part completed projects may be in jeopardy and you could run into trouble over your property renovation. It is always wise to carry out due diligence when undertaking any home improvement works and finding out whether there are any changes to legislation and what the current legislation is regarding your particular proposed project.

What are the basement conversions building regulationsCompare quotes from builders for building work

Basement conversions building regulations

If you are considering converting your basement or cellar it might be worth finding out if there are any planning permission issues or basement conversions building regulations matters to be investigated first.

Remember, if planning permission or building regulations approval is not sought and works are carried out, completed or part completed projects may be in jeopardy.

You could run into trouble over your property renovation.

It is always wise to carry out due diligence when undertaking any home improvement works and finding out whether there are any changes to legislation and what the current legislation is regarding your particular proposed project.

Planning Permission Relating To Basement Conversions / Cellar Conversions

Architect rolls and plans blueprints home building conceptFirst and foremost you should know that if you live in a listed building or conservation area you should always consult building control or your local planning office before undertaking works as more often than not you will require planning permission for most property renovation or remedial works.

If you are converting an existing residential property's cellar or basement into living space you should not normally require planning permission to carry out these works.

However, if the conversion you are undertaking is likely to change the exterior of the property (for example adding a window / light well), then you may need planning permission and should consult building control.

If you intend to excavate an area or dig below footings to convert a cellar or basement or if the work you are carrying out to your cellar is likely to be considered major works then you may well need planning permission.

Again, building control should be able to advise accordingly.

Any general changes to the exterior of your property or to the area in general will need to be discussed with your local planning office.

The legislation regarding cellar conversions and basement conversions is constantly changing.

It is wise to keep abreast of these developments regarding basement conversions building regulations before undertaking any works.

A good basement conversion or cellar conversion contractor may have information which might be useful for you.

However it is always better to take advice from impartial authorities and official bodies such as your local planning office or building control over contractors who might be inclined to sell you on having works carried out.

Miniature House With Various Drafting Items and Plans.

Building Regulations Relating To Basement Conversions / Cellar Conversions

Basement and cellar conversions are subject to Building Regulations covering the following areas:

  • Means of Escape
  • Fire Safety Matters
  • Ventilation Issues
  • Lighting
  • Height of Ceilings
  • Electrical Wiring And Safety

If In Doubt?

Contact your local building control to discuss your proposals and to take proper advice.

Top Tradespeople do not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of this information.

Professional advice should always be sought if in doubt prior to commencing any home improvement projects.

Now that you have an idea about basement conversions building regulations you may need a builder.

Use Top Tradespeople's free quotes services to compare multiple quotes from builders.

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Building Regulations Garage Conversions

With regards to planning permission relating to garage conversions you should always contact building control or your local planning office as some properties may have had permitted development rights removed. However, the good news is that since April 2008 generally speaking garage conversions are deemed to be not subject to planning permission as long as the work carried out is all internal and you are not increasing the size of the building (house) or your garage. This relates ONLY to houses, and NOT flats or commercial property types.

What Building Regulations Relate To Garage Conversions in Building Work?

Planning Permission - Garage Conversions

think about the building regulations garage conversions may require in building workCompare quotes from builders for building workWith regards to planning permission relating to garage conversions you should always contact building control or your local planning office as some properties may have had permitted development rights removed. However, the good news is that since April 2008 generally speaking garage conversions are deemed to be not subject to planning permission as long as the work carried out is all internal and you are not increasing the size of the building (house) or your garage. This relates ONLY to houses, and NOT flats or commercial property types.

Always remember that if you live in a listed building or conservation area (you should already know whether you do), you should always check with building control or the local planning office before undertaking any home improvement work whatsoever as listed buildings and properties within conservation areas are subject to much more stringent planning permissions with regards to home improvement projects.

Building Regulations And Garage Conversions

House PlanningConverting a garage will normally be subject to certain building regulations compliance.

The regulations relating to garage conversions can largely be categorized accordingly:

  • Floor Areas - Floor needs to be of a suitable concrete substance with adequate moisture levels to act as an interior part of a domestic property.
  • External Walls - A suitable cavity needs to be provided. Often garages are originally single cavity and therefore a double cavity external wall is required.
  • Internal Walls - An openings to internal walls need to be suitably structurally secured and levels of insulation need to be adequate.
  • Ventilation - Suitable levels of ventilation to the garage conversion must be met.
  • Electrics - Electrical works must be carried out in accordance with current electrical legislation and carried out by either a qualified electrician or a competent person (depending on the kind of electrical work being undertaken).
  • Drainage - Drainage must be adequate to take water and bathroom plumbing waste away from the property.
  • Roof - Roof must be constructed with the suitable pitch and not extend beyond the permitted boundaries and be constructed with materials that are in fitting with the main building.

Home Builder 4If In Doubt - Check It Out

For the sake of a phonecall or even an online enquiry it really is not worth holdups and trouble further down the line. It is always important to ensure that any home improvement work is carried out in accordance with current building legislation and has the appropriate planning permission if required.

Building regulations are constantly changing so it is important to check out whether your latest project requires any kind of permission or certification before proceeding.

A good local builder or building contractor will have a good idea of the current legislation regarding building works, however it is best to speak to an impartial source for advice when seriously considering home improvement.

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Conservatories Building Regulations

Considering a conservatory? Check below whether you need planning permission or if building regulations apply before proceeding with works.

Compare conservatory quotesBuilding Regulations For Conservatories

Conservatories Building Regulations - Considering a conservatory?

Check below whether you need planning permission or if building regulations apply before proceeding with works.

Always remember that if you carry out works to your home and planning permission is required or building regulations are not adhered to, your works (whether completed or not), may have to be returned to their state prior to commencement.

It is always advisable to ensure that the works you are carrying out, whether conservatories or other home improvement or property renovation projects, are carried out according to current legislation and permissions if required to do so.

Planning Permission Relating To Conservatories

Conservatory 2Any works carried out to listed properties or in conservation areas may require planning permission and if this applies to you, you should contact Building Control by default before proceeding with any kind of home improvement projects.

Conservatories currently (since 1st October 2008) are normally excempt from planning permission applications as long as they are carried out in accordance with the following guidelines:

  • The extension (conservatory) is to the rear of the property or to the side of the property as long as the side of the property does not meet the road / street.
  • The conservatory and other outbuildings (maybe you have some existing outbuildings, outhouses or other fixed structures to your home), must not cover more than half of the land around the house.
  • Must not extend more than 4 metres beyond the original house wall if a detached house, no more than 3 metres if a semi-detached / terraced property / townhouse.
  • Maximum height is 4 metres for conservatories or other single storey extensions to houses.
  • As with extensions, loft conversions, conservatories are not permitted to have balconies, raised platforms or verandahs without planning permission.

Building Regulations - Conservatories

conservatoryBuilding regulations do not apply to conservatories normally as long as they are built according to the following building guidelines.

  • Good quality exterior doors (can be glazed or patio doors), separates the conservatory from the house (NB: Knock-throughs between your conservatory and home leaving an opening may be subject to building regulations and planning permission)
  • A minimum of 50 percent of the walls and 75 percent of the roof must be made of glazing or some other translucent or similar material (failing this, your conservatory may be classed as an extension and be subject to planning permission).
  • Electrical works carried out in accordance with the required legislation and building regulations relating to electrical works, preferably by a registered electrician, and at the very least, by a competent person.
  • Cannot be more than 30 square metres in floor space
  • Glazing must be carried out in accordance with current glazing legislation (fenestration legislation and regulations).
  • Must be single storey.

If In Doubt About Conservatories Building Regulations?

Contact your local building control to discuss your proposals and to take proper advice.  A good conservatory company should also be well versed with current conservatories building regulations.

Top Tradespeople do not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of this information and professional advice should always be sought if in doubt prior to commencing any home improvement projects.

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Building Regulations And Electrics In Bathrooms And Kitchens

When you are getting electrical work done in the bathroom, it is important to understand the implications of the Part P of the Building Regulations. If a homeowner is getting electrical work done in the bathroom, they must comply with Part P by either using a Competent Persons Scheme electrician, or by submitting a Building Regulations application to the Local Authority

Working With Electrics In Kitchens And Bathrooms

follow regulations when working with electrics in bathrooms and kitchensCompare electricians quotes for bathroom electrics and other household electrical workWhen you are getting electrical work done in the bathroom, it is important to understand the implications of the Part P of the Building Regulations. If a homeowner is getting electrical work done in the bathroom, they must comply with Part P by either using a Competent Persons Scheme electrician, or by submitting a Building Regulations application to the Local Authority. However, in most cases the simplest and most economical method of accomplishing this is to have the electrical installation work performed by a qualified electrician registered with an authorized Part P Competent Person Scheme. If you use this method, the electrician will not only perform and test the electrical work, but also notify the appropriate authorities. If you choose a different method, you will still have to pay to have the electrical work to be inspected. It is often much less expensive to just have a Competent Person perform the entire electricians job.

Round bath in a luxury mansionElectricians - What is a Competent Person?

The term "Competent Person" refers to a firm that has been approved by one of the Part P schemes approved by the government as being competent to self-certify that any electrical work performed complies with the Building Regulations. Part P was introduced to reduce the number of fires, injuries and deaths caused by electrical installations that were performed in a faulty fashion. There are several advantages to using a "Competent Person". For example, you will have the option of taking out an insurance-backed guarantee for the work that is being performed, you won't have to pay Building Control charges, and if you are not happy with the work that was performed, you will have access to a formal complaint procedure.

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Electricians - Electrics in the Bathroom

For the purpose of wiring regulations, the bathroom is divided into zones that range from Zone 0, which is the wettest, which is an area that actually can hold water, such as the interior of the bath or shower, to Zone 2. Electrical

cream-and-dark-wood-bathroom-with-shower-room

equipment is rated in regards to its level of mechanical and moisture protection. If the equipment doesn't an an IP number, it cannot be used in these zones, or anywhere else that has a wet or damp environment, for that matter. Some of the typical bathroom electrical items that have these IP numbers include lighting, heaters, extractor fans, shower pumps, and electrical shower units.

Electricians - Electricians and Electric Showers

If you are planning to install an electric shower, which is installed as a wall unit using an electric element to heat the water, it is advisable to have this work done by an electrician registered with an authorized Part P Competent Person Scheme. While electric showers are quite popular and convenient, they can be dangerous if they are installed incorrectly. There are regulations about electric showers and their installation that are simply best handled by an electrician. The installation for these units varies, depending on the model that is being installed, so an electrician will not only be aware of the proper method, but also knowledgeable concerning the regulations about electric showers and their installation.

If you need a qualified electrician you can use our 'COMPARE TRADESMEN' form above to post a job and get no-obligation quotes from local electrical contractors near you.

Why not compare quotes from bathroom fitters for works such as these:

  • Bathroom suite fitting services
  • Toilets fitting
  • Sinks fitted
  • Shower enclosures fitted
  • Bathroom refurbishments and renovations
  • Bathroom design services

Compare electricians quotes for bathroom electrics and other household electrical work

Window Fitting Building Regulations

Always keep in mind that if you reside in a place categorized as a preservation area or your home is a listed building then you might have to find out about planning permission for most kinds of do it yourself venture.

Always keep in mind that if you reside in a place categorised as a preservation area or your home is a listeCompare quotes from window fitters and double glazing installers across the UK with Top Tradespeopled building then you might have to find out about planning permission for most kinds of do it yourself venture as these types of properties can fall outside of the regulations for unlisted homes.

These regulations relate to England and Wales and could differ in Scotland.  It is always advisable to check with your local Building Control office if in any doubt.

Windows (Installations and Glazing) - Planning Permissions

You should not usually have to seek planning authorization if you are simply replacing your windows. This includes alternative replacement windows, alternative double glazing and hard patio doors, however with regards to alternative double glazing ensure you conform to building rules which came into force 1st Apr 2002.

Conservatory 2Repairs to existing hard windows, doubled hard units or double glazing windows are normally exempt from planning permission.

Building Regulations - Windows and Glazing

Ventilation and Windows

Windows which are fixed in restrooms, cooking areas or other areas in which vapor is normally created must have sufficient air flow, usually in the form of electric powered ventilators.

Building Regulations - Safety - Windows

Glazing - Replacements

conservatorySince regulation came into force 1st Apr 2002 any replacement double glazing must conform to building regulations with regards to energy-efficiency, air flow, heat and issues of health and safety.

In particular when fitting double glazing within window areas which come below 800mm from ground level, 300mm from a entrance or a hard entrance area up to 1500mm from the earth, you must fit only double glazing which meets safety standards.

Other safety aspects must be considered when changing windows or installing new windows, including the important matter of escape. Window spaces when suitable replacement windows must be at least the minimum size required for safe means of escape via the windows.

If the windows which were originally installed were over sized it is deemed acceptable to reduce the size of the new windows that you are fitting as long as the size still complies with specifications relating to the means of escape requirements mentioned above.

If changing windows at a first floor level or higher it is recommended that non-escape windows be changed with windows which are considered appropriate for means of escape and of course are in line with minimum window size requirements of not less than 450mm in both width and height.

Compare quotes from window fitters and double glazing installers across the UK with Top Tradespeople

Exterior Of House With Conservatory And PatioWindows - Energy Efficiency

The objective when you are installing windows is to get the smallest possible u-value, (i.e - the least amount of heat lost through the windows as possible).

Thermal heat loss from windows is calculated by something which is called U-value. Described in more detail, the U-value is essentially the rate at which windows and other materials lose heat.

All homes are now expected to be as energy efficient as possible and new windows should always be fitted with the minimum U-value required to be compliant.  The values for these are listed below:

Miniature House With Various Drafting Items and Plans.Glass U-Values

  • Single glazing - 5.0 U-value
  • Double glazing - 3.0 U-value
  • Triple glazing - 2.2 u-value
  • Double glazing with low e-coating - 1.7 u-value
  • Double glazing with low e-coating and argon filled 1.3 u-value
  • Triple glazing with multiple low e-coatings and xenon filled 0.4 u-value

An added advantage of working with U-Values is that you may benefit from lower fuel and heating bills in particular.  So, there are also financial ongoing benefits to installing new windows which are energy efficient.

The plan is readyBuilding Regulations - Window Installation

When having new windows fitted, it is essential that these are fitted by a competent person and that you obtain certification on completion.  FENSA registered tradesmen are able to provide this documentation.  Failing to gain certification when you have a major piece of home improvement work such as window fitting undertaken could lead to major problems when it comes to selling your home.

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Double Glazing Building Regulations

Always keep in mind that if you reside in a place categorized as a preservation area or your home is a listed building then you might have to find out about planning permission for most kinds of do it yourself venture.

Double Glazing Building Regulations

When fitting double glazing building regulations should be consideredCompare quotes from window fitters and double glazing installers across the UK with Top TradespeopleDouble glazing building regulations.

Always keep in mind that if you reside in a place categorised as a preservation area or your home is a listed building then you might have to find out about planning permission for most kinds of do it yourself venture.

Windows (Installations and Glazing) - Planning Permissions

You should not usually have to seek planning authorization if you are simply replacing your windows.

This includes alternative replacement windows, alternative double glazing and hard patio doors.

With regards to alternative double glazing ensure you conform to building rules which came into force 1st Apr 2002.

Repairs to existing hard windows, doubled hard units or double glazing windows are normally exempt from planning permission.

Double Glazing Building Regulations - Windows and Glazing

conservatoryVentilation and Windows

Windows which are fixed in restrooms, cooking areas or other areas in which vapor is normally created must have sufficient air flow, usually in the form of electric powered ventilators.

Building Regulations - Safety - Windows

Glazing - Replacements

conservatorySince regulation came into force 1st Apr 2002 any replacement double glazing must conform to building regulations with regards to energy-efficiency, air flow, heat and issues of health and safety.

In particular when fitting double glazing within window areas which come below 800mm from ground level, 300mm from a entrance or a hard entrance area up to 1500mm from the earth, you must fit only double glazing which meets safety standards.

Other safety aspects must be considered when changing windows or installing new windows.

These include the important matter of escape.

Window spaces when suitable replacement windows must be at least the minimum size required for safe means of escape via the windows.

If the windows which were originally installed were over sized it is deemed acceptable to reduce the size of the new windows that you are fitting as long as the size still complies with specifications relating to the means of escape requirements mentioned above.

If changing windows at a first floor level or higher it is recommended that non-escape windows be changed with windows which are considered appropriate for means of escape.

Of course your windows must be in line with minimum window size requirements of not less than 450mm in both width and height.

Compare quotes from window fitters and double glazing installers across the UK with Top Tradespeople

window in houseDouble Glazing Building Regulations - Windows - Energy Efficiency

The objective when you are installing windows is to get the smallest possible u-value.

This means the least amount of heat lost through your windows as possible.

Thermal heat loss from windows is calculated by something which is called U-value.

Described in more detail, the U-value is essentially the rate at which your windows and other materials lose heat.

All homes are now expected to be as energy efficient as possible.

New windows you install should always be fitted with the minimum U-value required to be compliant.

The values you should follow for these are listed below:

Double Glazing Building Regulations - Glass U-Values

  • Single glazing - 5.0 U-value
  • Double glazing - 3.0 U-value
  • Triple glazing - 2.2 u-value
  • Double glazing with low e-coating - 1.7 u-value
  • Double glazing with low e-coating and argon filled 1.3 u-value
  • Triple glazing with multiple low e-coatings and xenon filled 0.4 u-value

An added advantage of working with U-Values is that you may benefit from lower fuel and heating bills in particular.

So, there are also financial ongoing benefits you can gain via installing new windows which are energy efficient.

building plansBuilding Regulations - Window Installation

When having new windows fitted, it is essential that these are fitted by a competent person.

You should obtain certification on completion.

FENSA registered tradesmen are able to provide you with this documentation.

Failing to gain certification when you have a major piece of home improvement work such as window fitting undertaken could lead to major problems when it comes to selling your home.

You will likely be asked to provide certification as part of the 'selling your home' process.

Non-provision will undoubtedly slow down your property-sale process.

Need Window Fitters?

If you want to compare quotes from window fitters and installers quickly and easily, now that you have an idea of double glazing building regulations, why not try Top Tradespeople's free tradesmen quotes services?

You can post a job using our jobs posting form above.

We will then get to work finding you window fitting companies and other window fitting tradespeople to provide quotes for you from our network of UK tradesmen.

Good luck with your window fitting project.

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Conservatories Planning Permissions

Conservatories Planning Permission - Avoid the pitfalls when planning your conservatory

Compare conservatory quotesconservatory, but will you need conservatories planning permission for your project?Conservatories planning permission.  Most conservatories you may want to build are considered a ‘permitted development’.

A large proportion of all timber and uPVC conservatories you can  safely start working on without planning permission.

There are a few exceptions to the rule, which you should consider.

Make sure you aren’t caught out without necessary regulations with the following guidelines:

When do you need planning when building a conservatory?

  1. If your build extends beyond the side wall of your original home and you live on ‘designated land’, you may need planning permission.
  2. This type of project is not considered a ‘permitted development’.
  3. Designated land is land protected in some way, like a national park or a conservation area.
  4. So if you live on Exmoor or the Brecon Beacons, check with your planning department first.
  5. Exterior Of House With Conservatory And PatioRestrictions on the total amount you can extend your home are in place.
  6. If you have already extended your home in any way, it’s best to check before you start on that conservatory.
  7. As a rule of thumb, you can’t extend your property by more than 50% in total without extra conservatories planning permission.
  8. Your conservatory cannot front a highway or be forward of the principal or side elevation of the home.
  9. Rear conservatories you build have height and build restrictions.
  10. They must be no higher than four metres and cannot extend further than three metres from your property.
  11. Watch where your build ends.
  12. If it is within two metres of your boundary line, restrictions on height apply.
  13. Conservatories built on the side of your house cannot be more than 50% of the width of the house.
  14. The height of the eaves of your conservatory cannot be higher than the eaves of the original home.
  15. If you are planning a conservatory with its own independent heating system you may need conservatories planning permission.
  16. You may also need to meet building regulations.
  17. If your conservatory is separated from the house by external doors then planning permission may need to be sought by you.

If in doubt, you should check with your local planning authority.

Expert help with planning and building a conservatory

conservatoryChoose a trusted tradesperson to help with your conservatory from conception and planning to completion.

Post a job using Top Tradespeople and we’ll look for up to four conservatory companies to quote for your project and help make sure that your conservatory dreams come true.

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Planning Permission Application Costs

How much does it cost to apply for planning permission?

Compare quotes from architects with recommendations from other people across the UK with Top Tradespeopleplanning permission application costs - what are they when you have the building plans readyPlanning permission application costs.

Any home improvement project, whether you're doing it yourself or getting a tradesman or more specifically a builder in to do it for you, will have costs.

Materials and labour are obvious costs if you're looking to make a significant structural home alterations.

If you're going to be changing the dimensions or use of your property there may be even more costs.

You need to make sure you've got the relevant planning permission to ensure you don't fall foul of local regulations.

And this is where you need to consider planning permission application costs.

When do I need planning permission?

write-593333_1920The guidance on when you need to get planning permission is complex

Whether you need planning permission depends on the kind of property you're altering.

 

It also depends on the land that surrounds the property you're looking to alter.

If you live in a detached or semi-detached house, the regulations on the work that you can do to alter the property will be different than you're looking to modify a mid-terraced house that's overlooked from all sides.

There is plenty of helpful guidance available online that sets out the types of modifications you can made to a house without planning permission and when you need to seek it.

notes-514998_1920It's important to look through the local regulations in detail.

These can differ from area to area.

These can be dramatically different if, for instance, you're living in a National Park or other such area where the Council strictly controls external appearances of properties.

Even works that affect the trees or hedgerows on or surrounding your property can require a planning application if they are protected by a preservation or conservation order.

It's always wise to consult your local council's planning department before starting on any significant work on your property.

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Architect rolls and plans blueprints home building conceptHow much will planning permission application costs be?

Again, this very much depends on the area where you live and what you intend to do.

If you're building an entirely new property from scratch, you will need to apply for a Lawful Development Certificate.

This will add to the costs of applying for planning permission.

An application for Householder Planning Consent to make an alteration or house extension to an existing property will have planning permission application costs on average of around £171.

This may be more depending on where you live and the type of alteration that you plan to make.

While the planning permission application costs and fees may not vary significantly, the scale and types of alterations that you can make to a property in certain areas may be restricted.

Cutting back trees or removing hedgerows in a conservation area require a planning application.

There are not currently planning permission application costs or fees for this type of consent at the moment.

Caveat Emptor

The main thing to remember when planning alterations to a property is that if you're in any doubt, speak to the Planning department in your local council.

Retrospective planning permission can be an extremely tricky business to apply for and there's no guarantee of success.

After putting all the thought, work and investment into making alterations to the property, if planning permission is not granted retrospectively, it can cost a whole lot more to take down what you've already done on top of the expense of putting it up.

Whilst this is rare (most people apply first before building), it is not unheard of and there are tales of people having to take down whole houses.

Drafting a bathroomNeed Quotes From Builders?

If you are ready to get quotes for your building project then why not consider using our free service.

You can compare up to 4 local builders quotes for your work.

If you already have your builders in place, then you may need other local tradesmen for your renovation or building work.

We can help you get quotes from a wide range of home improvement service providersand local tradespeople generally.

Our service is free and the quotes from tradesmen are no obligation.

You have nothing to lose and could make substantial savings on your building job.

If you are not yet at the building stage then maybe we can help you find and compare quotes from local architects for building design and plans or local surveyors for a range of building surveys and more.

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Top Areas To Find Arcgitects

Building Regulations Bathrooms

When it comes to fitting a new bathroom suite or completely refurbishing a bathroom there are a few things you should bear in mind with regards to the legalities which may be involved which you may not be aware of.

Compare bathoom fitters quotesBathroom planning and draftingBuilding regulations bathrooms.  When it comes to fitting a new bathroom suite or completely refurbishing a bathroom there are a few things you should bear in mind.

There are a number of issues relating to building regulations bathrooms and possibly planning permission too.

This is with regards to the legalities which may be involved which you may not be aware of.

Bathrooms Building Regulations

In recent years home improvement has become increasingly subject to building regulations and planning permission.

These are the primary issues which you need to consider with regards to building regulations bathrooms, when carrying out a bathroom refurb.

Part P Building Regulations And Bathrooms

Under-cabinet-bathroom-lightingPart P building regulations relates primarily to electrical works and a major part of this legislation directly affects electrics fitted in bathrooms and kitchens (i.e. areas where water is likely to come into contact with electricity).

The legislation can be largely broken down into 4 areas:

  • All electrical work must be carried out by a competent person
  • Minor electrical works (such as electric showers and extractor fans in bathrooms and kitchens), must be certified with a minor works certificate which should be issued to you by your local electrician.
  • Quality electrical materials must be used.
  • Shower rooms, bathrooms and kitchens are considered 'special locations' and nearly all electrical works carried out in these areas must be notified to building control - to be on the safe side, ensure that you obtain the relevant certification, not only from a safety perspective but also to prevent any problems with missing paperwork if you come to try to sell your property and are unable to verify any bathroom modifications work.
  • If upgrading your electric shower check with the manufacturers instructions to see if any notifications are required to remain compliant. Good quality showers will normally have information accompanying them about this matter.

Compare quotes for bathroom fitting (including whirlpool baths) from bathroom fitting contractors across the UK

Bathrooms and External Ventilation Regulations

When fitting a bathroom, shower room, wetroom or cloakroom, it is essential that external ventilation of some sort is available.

Whilst most bathrooms and shower rooms etc, will normally have an external window fitted in any event, if there is no window present it is imperative that an extractor fan is fitted.

Luxury bathroom interiorEn Suite Bathrooms Building Regulations

An ensuite bathroom cannot lead directly into a bedroom (with just one door into the bathroom), if it is the only bathroom in the house.

Building Regulations Bathrooms With WC

Bathrooms with a toilet fitted in them must not open directly into a kitchen, living room or dining room.

Need A Bathroom Fitter?

Now that you have a good idea of the building regulations bathrooms situation, if you need a bathroom fitter and are looking for quotes from plumbers or bathroom fitters you can use our free service to compare quotes from several local plumbers.

You are not obliged to accept any quotes from tradesmen but comparing quotes using Top Tradespeople free plumbers quotes services could save you time and save you money by helping you get the best deal on bathroom fitting. Request quotes from bathrooms tradesmen.

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Building Regulations Kitchens

Building regulations are all around us, so when you are considering major refurbishment work such as a new kitchen design you should check out building regulations which might be relevant.

Compare quotes for kitchen fitting from installers across the UK with Top TradespeopleBuilding Regulations And Kitchens

House, Blueprints & ToolsBuilding regulations kitchens.

Regulations are all around us, so when you are considering major refurbishment work such as a new kitchen design you should check out building regulations which might be relevant.

Planning Permission - Kitchens

First the good news - planning permission is not generally required when planning a new kitchen unless the kitchen is part of a house extension or a listed building.

If your home is a listed building you should bear in mind that you should always contact building control whenever you are wanting to undertake any kind of home improvement work, whether it's a new kitchen or other home improvement or DIY project.

These regulations primarily related to England.  Regulations around building projects in kitchens might vary in other regions, for example in Wales.

Building Regulations Kitchens - Fitting A Kitchen In A New Room

New stylish kitchenGenerally if your new kitchen is going to be fitted in an existing room which is already a kitchen then there is no requirement to inform building control.

If you are planning to fit a kitchen in a room in your home which is not presently a kitchen you will probably need to comply with building regulations.

These relate primarily to ventilation, fire safety and drainage requirements.

flooding kitchenIf in doubt you should always contact building control to establish and clarify whether any kitchens building regulations need to be complied with relating to your home improvement plans.

Need Kitchen Fitters Quotes Or Kitchen Designers?

If you want to compare quotes from local kitchen fitters and get free quotes for kitchen design, kitchen supply and fit or kitchen renovation you can you use our free tradesmen quotes service to Find A Kitchen Fitter.

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